Blog : Dr. Novick's Blog

DR NOVICK FEATURED ON RMWorldTravel RADIO SHOW

Dr Novick recently was interviewed by RMWorld Travel, America’s #1 Travel Radio Show. RMWorld Travel reaches well over 1 million upscale leisure and business travelers via 375+ affiliated weekly radio stations across the USA, as well as our global 24/7 TuneIn.com channel, live streaming, social media, online and more. 

RMWorld Travel says “Since Travel can be more than a  beach vacation or catching a flight to make a business meeting in another city, we invited Dr. Bill Novick to join us during our live broadcast of RMWorldTravel with Robert & Mary Carey and Rudy Maxa, for our “Personal Connection” series on 30 June 2018, to share some of his experiences via his travels to provide meaningful impact on kids, families and communities globally, as well as the opportunities for others to do the same.”

Listen to his interview HERE 

You can follow RMWorld Travel on their Facebook page.

 

Dr Novick featured in Men’s Journal

Journalist Jordan Campbell joined our team on several trips this past year gathering information about Dr. Novick and the mission of Novick Cardiac Alliance. The article is featured in Men’s Journal June 2018 edition.

 

The World Loses Another Giant in Pediatric Heart Surgery

Dr. Francis Fontan

When receiving the news that Dr. Francis Fontan passed away earlier this week, Dr. Novick’s initial response was “Another giant in pediatric heart surgery passed from our midst.” Dr. Fontan is the individual who pioneered the development of the “Fontan” operation. The Fontan operation made it possible for those children born with one ventricle to have a chance to separate the “red” from the “blue” blood and lead nearly normal lives for many years. Dr Fontan’s contribution to the field of pediatric heart surgery cannot be over-emphasized as it is the final operation which nearly all children born with one ventricle receive thus providing them with a future free of the debilitating effects of chronic cyanosis.

Fontan Procedure

 

Dr. Novick reminisced about meeting Dr. Fontan.

“As a resident in cardio-thoracic surgery at the University of Alabama from 1987-1991 I was fortunate to meet Dr. Fontan on more than one occasion because of his professional and personal relationships with Dr. John W. Kirklin and Albert D. Pacifico. I will never forget my first encounter with Dr. Fontan. He was visiting Birmingham to work on the finishing touches of his sentinel paper with Dr. Kirklin, “The Perfect Fontan”. On the day I had the honor of meeting him I was assigned by Dr. Pacifico to start the second case of the day. As would have it, by design I am sure, it was a child who needed a completion “Fontan.”

As usual this required a redo-sternotomy, which we performed without difficulty. When I sent word to Dr. Pacifico that the sternum was open, I received an unusual response, “Proceed”, which meant he wanted me to lyse the adhesions and place the cannulation sutures to enable the patient to be placed on bypass. I knew that Dr. Fontan was in the hospital and might be visiting the operating rooms, so I was a bit nervous. Nonetheless we proceeded without incident. When I sent word again to Dr. Pacifico that we were ready for him to cannulate and place the patient on bypass, I was again greeted with “Proceed.” This response was totally unexpected as I had never placed a “Fontan” completion patient on bypass, and I was early in my residency. So, as I was placing the arterial cannula, Dr Fontan suddenly appears above the anesthesia screen and says ‘Good morning Dr. Novick!’ Well as fate would have it, I muffed the cannulation and could not get the arterial cannula in. I stopped and responded ‘Good morning Dr. Fontan, sorry I muffed the cannulation, could you please ask Dr. Pacifico to come now.’ Francis laughed and apologized for spooking me at exactly the time I had tried to place the aortic cannula. Remembering this encounter with Dr. Fontan reminds me of the importance of having a sense of humor even while performing challenging heart surgery.”

Francis Fontan, creator of the Fontan operation, actually considered his greatest accomplishment the formation of the European Association of Cardio-thoracic Surgery. He is truly an innovative leader in pediatric cardiac surgery and one of the main individuals responsible for the progress of cardiac surgery in Europe. The world will miss Francis, but we can never forget his tremendous contributions to the field of cardiac surgery, specifically pediatric cardiac surgery. His legacy to this world can be found in the thousands of adults living with Fontan circulation today. We imagine that he and Dr. John Kirklin are together now, perhaps discussing “The Perfect Fontan.”

The Ugly Duckling and the Swan

The Ugly Duckling and the Swan

I am sure you remember the childhood story of the Ugly Duckling who was constantly reminded of his physical shortcomings as he grew up. Children with single ventricle defects remind me of this story of the Ugly duckling who grows up to be a beautiful swan.Julia at work

Unlike most of us, who have two ventricles, children with one ventricle spend a great deal of their childhood as in-patients in hospitals or visiting doctors in out-patient clinics. They are poked routinely for blood tests, examined constantly for the functionality of the one pumping chamber they have and questioned by other children as to why they can’t play the normal childhood games . Against this nearly continuous barrage of unwanted attention these children must grow up, go through the normal milestones all kids attain and become adults, with little knowledge of how long they have been granted time on this earth.

We don’t know how long these single ventricle operations will keep children alive because the operation is only 43 years old itself and has undergone so many modifications that much of the previous research experience is now meaningless. We do know that the latest versions of the Fontan-Kreutzer Operation are keeping more people alive longer, but whether that will translate into a life-span on this earth that approaches normal is unknown at this time.So an uncertain future, harangued and harassed as children and told they are not the same as others, does this not sound like the Ugly Duckling?Julia in 1994

Twenty-one years ago in Kyiv, Ukraine there was a child of 7 years of age, who wore the label of single ventricle, or Ugly Duckling. Julia lived in a country where few Fontan procedures had ever been performed, and certainly not with success. The first picture, taken just after discharge from the ICU, does not reveal the Swan that she would become. As a young woman post Fontan she did not know she was supposed to continue in the Ugly Duckling role, she decided that since she had been given a second chance at life she would use every second to live life to her full capacity.Julia scuba diving

So our Ugly Duckling finished primary school and overtime the Swan began to emerge, first exceling in her advanced studies and then entering into a career that no Ugly Duckling could have imagined she became a successful Fashion Model. Traveling to far away sites for modeling shoots, what about a single ventricle scuba diving? Today she is considering the next career in her eyes, she wants to be a mother, and this is what reunited us 21 years later. She had developed an urge so powerful to meet the surgeon who had given her the opportunity for this second birthday and new life that she did not quit searching until she succeeded. I met this new Julia in Ukraine just last week.Dr No and Julia

Parents of children with single ventricle should celebrate the lives these children have and always remember that these ‘Ugly Ducklings’ can and do grow up to be magnificent Swans.Julia smiling