Blog : Travel

Cardiac Alliance returns to Ecuador

 

With our trip sponsors With Every Heartbeat, The Fialeny Foundation

Novick Cardiac Alliance worked at Hospital del Nino’s Dr. Francisco Ycaza Bustamante in Guayaquil, Ecuador April 28 – May 12, 2018. This was the first time our team returned to Hospital del Nino since 2014. This trip was made possible by the generous donations from our partners “With Every Heartbeat, the Fialeny Foundation” and support from Ecuadorian charity “Fundacion El Cielo Para Los Ninos.”  Our team consisted of 17 medical volunteers from 12 different centers in the USA and Argentina. 

 

Over the two week trip, NCA Cardiologist Dr Mark Gellat evaluated nearly 70 children, performing echocardiograms and assessing these children for heart defects. Led by NCA pediatric heart surgeon Dr Marcelo Cardarelli, fifteen children received life-saving heart surgery in 8 days of operation. We were pleased to discover that the local team in Guayaquil had been continuing their education and teaching new staff skills to become more competent in pediatric cardiac care and surgery. The local surgeon Dr Hernan Montero has been operating in the absence of visiting teams and the ICU has been led by Venezuelan Intensivist Ricardo Briceno. Each morning during patient rounds, Dr Briceno quizzes nurses and new doctors about a specific defect or complication in order to expand their critical thinking skills.

The ICU team was led by PICU nurse educators Farzana Shah and Roslyn Rivera. Our ICU physicians and nurses provided 24 hour care for these children before and after surgery the entire two weeks. Many of the children were discharged from the hospital within 48 hours of surgery. The majority of the children we operated during this trip were between 5-12 years old, with simple heart defects that require surgery in order for them to survive into adulthood. These children have been on a waiting list for surgery for several years, but there are not enough surgeons in Ecuador to provide surgery. The babies born with more complex heart defects are often not as lucky. Complex heart defects require early intervention for babies to survive to age one. Our trip to Guayaquil helped enhance the medical skills of the surgeons, doctors, and nurses so they can continue to provide treatment for children with heart disease in their country. 

Milan is a baby with a complex heart defect that requires immediate surgery to survive.

For four months, Milan’s mother watched her baby turned dark blue whenever he would cry. Several times, she took him to the doctor in the village where they live, but the doctor would say that Milan would “grow out of it.” Searching for answers, Milan’s family brought him to the pay-clinic in Guayaquil. There the doctors told her he had a serious problem with his heart and he needed to see the cardiologist at the Bustamante Children’s Hospital. As if by fate, the next day, NCA cardiologist Dr Gellat saw Milan. Just from seeing his blue pale appearance, Dr Gellat knew immediately that Milan did indeed have a complex heart defect. The echocardiogram showed that Milan had pulmonary atresia, meaning blood was not flowing the normal way into his lungs to receive oxygen. His blue color was from severe lack of oxygenated blood. Our team discussed a plan and Milan received surgery to create a pathway for blood to flow to his lungs. 

Milan had a difficult recovery after his surgery, but was doing very well when our team left the country. We have received updates from Milan’s parents that is now home and happily growing. His parents were immensely happy to see their baby boy finally looking well.

It’s babies like Milan that remind us how desperately advanced pediatric cardiac care is needed in developing countries. Our teams strive to educate local teams about pediatric cardiology so that babies like Milan can be properly diagnosed and treated early, and given a chance to survive. 

Over 1,000 Hearts Healed in Iraq

 

Dr. Novick with Ayad in Nasiriyah Heart Center

In August 2010, before the end of the Iraq War, Dr. Novick and his teams began traveling to Iraq. We believed that Dr. Novick’s vision to provide cardiac care and surgery to children suffering from heart disease was more important than politics, religion or where these children were born. Over the course of the past 8 years, we have worked in 6 hospitals located in 5 different cities throughout Iraq. In December 2017, we celebrated performing our 1,000th pediatric heart surgery in Iraq.

 

Mohammed – Our 1,000th child operated in Iraq

Mohammed was only 17 days old when he received his life-saving heart surgery from our team in Karbala, Iraq. He was born with Transposition of the Great Arteries and without surgery, the chances of him surviving to be one year of age was slim. Weighing just 3 kilograms, Mohammed’s heart was only the size of a strawberry. Cardiac Alliance surgeon, Dr Marcello Cardarelli and Iraqi surgeon Dr Ahmed Ebra worked together to perform this delicate surgery. Mohammed recovered over the course of two weeks in the ICU and is now home with his parents just outside of Karbala. Mohammed may be the 1,000 child, but there are still thousands more children waiting for heart surgery in Iraq.

 

Since 2010, we have expanded our programs across the country of Iraq, beginning in the north in Sulaymaniyah to the spiritual capitol of Najaf. In the south, we began pediatric cardiac programs in Basra and at two centers in Nasiriyah. Our program in Karbala, located in central Iraq, has flourished with a fast-learning Iraqi pediatric cardiac surgeon. It’s through our collaboration with these 5 centers in Iraq that we have been able to provide life-saving heart surgery for over 1,000 children in Iraq.

Novick Cardiac Alliance is the only organization providing pediatric heart surgeries in Iraq. We strive to fulfill the ever-growing list of children who require surgery to survive. Without our volunteers and supporters, we could not achieve this. Thank you for you continued support.

We’ve Made Amazing Progress, And We’ll Lean In To Do Even More In 2017

We’ve Made Amazing Progress, And We’ll Lean In To Do Even More In 2017

Leaning in—this is the common posture we see in every hospital where we work. There are always parents leaning in toward their children, either out of concern or the desire to comfort. But just as often we find ourselves leaning in toward patients, providing the acute care they need. Working beside local teams, we lean in toward each other, sharing crucial techniques and skills.

Every country we work in has different needs. Some heart programmes are young, and training runs the gamut from basic to complex. We work with young surgeons developing skills, cardiologists who don’t have a lot of experience with a wide range heart defects, and nurses who don’t yet have the experience to recognize patient symptoms and needed responses post-surgery. In some countries we focus on making out-of-date procedures current.

1-38

During our recent medical trip to Basra, we worked with a local team that is established, efficient, and accustomed to working together. The surgical team are skilled, experienced heart surgeons who have already developed techniques in repairing diseased and damaged adult hearts. What they are now learning are the incredible complexities that come with hearts that didn’t develop in the correct way.

They are learning to look at the body’s systems in different ways—learning to assess how much can be corrected without affecting other organs, like the lungs, in negative ways. They need to learn an entirely different approach to the human heart, making repairs to allow it to function as it should, not necessarily to make it look like it should.

1-35

In Basra, we are able to connect the dots for medical professionals who often have book knowledge but lack hands-on practice. We see where gaps in knowledge exist, and are immediately able to teach, coach needed skills, and follow-up with further chances to practice.

Many on our team have worked in Iraq for years. We know the value of training local doctors and nurses, in equipping Iraqis to take care of their own children. We will continue to lean in during 2017. This is the posture that will continue to make a difference, not only for Iraq’s children, but for the country.

1-34

Why Libya?

Why Libya?

“More than 80% of our hospitals are either closed or not functioning properly” -Reida El Oakley, eastern Minister of Health, Libya.

“The instability exacerbates an already catastrophic situation. The so-called Islamic State group has established a stronghold around the coastal city of Sirte; a bombing campaign by a coalition of western powers is probable. Libya is home to thousands of militias. It cannot control its borders; migrants en route to Europe stream into the country.”

1-30

“A humanitarian emergency is gathering. Almost 2 million Libyans have serious unmet health needs and more than 1 million are at risk of food insecurity.” (Libya’s health crisis looks set to worsen by Talha Burki, The Lancet, April 2016)

Why do we travel to Libya, when other international groups consider it too dangerous? Why do we work so hard with local doctors and nurses to make surgeries happen when it sometimes feels like swimming against the tide?

1-32

Why do we gather donations of supplies from around the world, pack heavy duffle bags, and wrestle with airlines and customs agents in order to have the basic materials we need to work?

Why do we meet with government ministers and hospital administrators, and advocate for the kind of change that will make a permanent pediatric heart programme possible, so Libyan families don’t have to worry that they will lose their children before they get care?

Why do we keep going back to Libya?

It’s because of the children.

1-31

It’s because Libyan children can’t wait for every militia to lay down their arms to get their heart surgeries. They can’t wait for every politician to come to the table and agree on a path of peace before getting their heart healed. Libyan children just don’t have that kind of time.

It’s because we can be part of the solution. Instead of waiting for conditions to be right, we can help local health care professionals to make conditions right. We can teach surgical and care skills that spill out past the pediatric cardiac unit and into the wider health care arena. We can partner with dedicated local professionals who have vision—and help to make it happen.

1-28

You don’t give to Cardiac Alliance because we work in your neighbourhood. You don’t give because you believe in quick solutions. You give because you know that few will go to the places that need the help most, that change can take time, and because you know it’s possible—together.