Blog : Dr. Novick

Lessons Learned in Humanitarian Cardiac Surgery

Novick Cardiac Alliance had the opportunity to attend the 32nd Annual Meeting of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS) in Milan Italy in October 2018. Watch the video below of Dr. William Novick and Dr. Marcelo Cardarelli as they discuss “Lessons Learned in Humanitarian Cardiac Surgery.”

 

DR NOVICK FEATURED ON RMWorldTravel RADIO SHOW

Dr Novick recently was interviewed by RMWorld Travel, America’s #1 Travel Radio Show. RMWorld Travel reaches well over 1 million upscale leisure and business travelers via 375+ affiliated weekly radio stations across the USA, as well as our global 24/7 TuneIn.com channel, live streaming, social media, online and more. 

RMWorld Travel says “Since Travel can be more than a  beach vacation or catching a flight to make a business meeting in another city, we invited Dr. Bill Novick to join us during our live broadcast of RMWorldTravel with Robert & Mary Carey and Rudy Maxa, for our “Personal Connection” series on 30 June 2018, to share some of his experiences via his travels to provide meaningful impact on kids, families and communities globally, as well as the opportunities for others to do the same.”

Listen to his interview HERE 

You can follow RMWorld Travel on their Facebook page.

 

Cardiac Alliance Begins Pediatric Cardiac Program in Western Libya

“’In Libya, there are several thousand children that need heart surgery, including hundreds of new-borns’, says Dr. Novick. That is why, with the support of the Presidency Council and the UN’s World Health Organization, Dr. Novick has launched a one-year national program, hoping to treat more than 400 Libyan children’s hearts.”

Read more in this article featuring Cardiac Alliance’s work in Libya, by United Nations journalist Abel Kavanagh.

 

UNSMIL/Abel Kavanagh

Dr Novick featured in Men’s Journal

Journalist Jordan Campbell joined our team on several trips this past year gathering information about Dr. Novick and the mission of Novick Cardiac Alliance. The article is featured in Men’s Journal June 2018 edition.

 

Over 1,000 Hearts Healed in Iraq

 

Dr. Novick with Ayad in Nasiriyah Heart Center

In August 2010, before the end of the Iraq War, Dr. Novick and his teams began traveling to Iraq. We believed that Dr. Novick’s vision to provide cardiac care and surgery to children suffering from heart disease was more important than politics, religion or where these children were born. Over the course of the past 8 years, we have worked in 6 hospitals located in 5 different cities throughout Iraq. In December 2017, we celebrated performing our 1,000th pediatric heart surgery in Iraq.

 

Mohammed – Our 1,000th child operated in Iraq

Mohammed was only 17 days old when he received his life-saving heart surgery from our team in Karbala, Iraq. He was born with Transposition of the Great Arteries and without surgery, the chances of him surviving to be one year of age was slim. Weighing just 3 kilograms, Mohammed’s heart was only the size of a strawberry. Cardiac Alliance surgeon, Dr Marcello Cardarelli and Iraqi surgeon Dr Ahmed Ebra worked together to perform this delicate surgery. Mohammed recovered over the course of two weeks in the ICU and is now home with his parents just outside of Karbala. Mohammed may be the 1,000 child, but there are still thousands more children waiting for heart surgery in Iraq.

 

Since 2010, we have expanded our programs across the country of Iraq, beginning in the north in Sulaymaniyah to the spiritual capitol of Najaf. In the south, we began pediatric cardiac programs in Basra and at two centers in Nasiriyah. Our program in Karbala, located in central Iraq, has flourished with a fast-learning Iraqi pediatric cardiac surgeon. It’s through our collaboration with these 5 centers in Iraq that we have been able to provide life-saving heart surgery for over 1,000 children in Iraq.

Novick Cardiac Alliance is the only organization providing pediatric heart surgeries in Iraq. We strive to fulfill the ever-growing list of children who require surgery to survive. Without our volunteers and supporters, we could not achieve this. Thank you for you continued support.

The Hardest ‘Yes’ of Ramadan’s Life

The Hardest ‘Yes’ of Ramadan’s Life

2015.05.16.Libya.Cute.Kids.Fuji.Echo.25

A terrified, skinny boy arrived at the hospital. The cardiologist from Benghazi is looked at his heart, recommending urgent surgery. 

“Ramadan, will you let them operate on you?”

The 14 year-old has heard this question again and again for the past seven years. “Will you accept?”

His answer is always the same: “No.”

Fatherless and culturally an adult, Ramadan is old enough to make his own decision whether or not he will undergo surgery. He is also old enough to know what this will mean, what the process will be like, and what the outcome could be.

“He’s too afraid, he won’t accept,” his mother shared later. 

Ramadan lives in Derna, a Libyan city with heavy jihadist leanings and that was recently under ISIS control, but his heritage is southern Libyan, what many people here call “original Libyan.”

2015.05.21.Libya.Hospital.ICU.Ramadan_5
Arabs, Greeks, Italians, Turks, and others have conquered and settled this part of the world, but Ramadan’s people were here long before that.

The cardiologist slides her probe over the bumps of Ramadan’s ribs as Dr. Novick leans forward, looks in his eyes, and says “Ramadan, we can make you feel better.”

Someone translates the words as Ramadan stares back.

His mother wipes Ramadan’s chest and helps pull his shirt down, a worried expression on her face. Ramadan’s face is blank the entire time.

Goodbyes are said, and the family begins to leave.

A few feet from the door, the cardiologist calls out more time: “Ramadan, will you let them operate on you?” 

“…yes.”

2015.05.21.Libya.Hospital.ICU.Ramadan_80

A few days later, Doctor Novick and the team gave Ramadan the lifesaving heart surgery he needed, his recovery went beautifully, and he even told Stacey he didn’t want to leave! Thank you for sending our teams to serve children on the margins, in war-torn, ISIS-disputed territory like Libya.

You are giving families the chance to finally say “yes.”

The Ugly Duckling and the Swan

The Ugly Duckling and the Swan

I am sure you remember the childhood story of the Ugly Duckling who was constantly reminded of his physical shortcomings as he grew up. Children with single ventricle defects remind me of this story of the Ugly duckling who grows up to be a beautiful swan.Julia at work

Unlike most of us, who have two ventricles, children with one ventricle spend a great deal of their childhood as in-patients in hospitals or visiting doctors in out-patient clinics. They are poked routinely for blood tests, examined constantly for the functionality of the one pumping chamber they have and questioned by other children as to why they can’t play the normal childhood games . Against this nearly continuous barrage of unwanted attention these children must grow up, go through the normal milestones all kids attain and become adults, with little knowledge of how long they have been granted time on this earth.

We don’t know how long these single ventricle operations will keep children alive because the operation is only 43 years old itself and has undergone so many modifications that much of the previous research experience is now meaningless. We do know that the latest versions of the Fontan-Kreutzer Operation are keeping more people alive longer, but whether that will translate into a life-span on this earth that approaches normal is unknown at this time.So an uncertain future, harangued and harassed as children and told they are not the same as others, does this not sound like the Ugly Duckling?Julia in 1994

Twenty-one years ago in Kyiv, Ukraine there was a child of 7 years of age, who wore the label of single ventricle, or Ugly Duckling. Julia lived in a country where few Fontan procedures had ever been performed, and certainly not with success. The first picture, taken just after discharge from the ICU, does not reveal the Swan that she would become. As a young woman post Fontan she did not know she was supposed to continue in the Ugly Duckling role, she decided that since she had been given a second chance at life she would use every second to live life to her full capacity.Julia scuba diving

So our Ugly Duckling finished primary school and overtime the Swan began to emerge, first exceling in her advanced studies and then entering into a career that no Ugly Duckling could have imagined she became a successful Fashion Model. Traveling to far away sites for modeling shoots, what about a single ventricle scuba diving? Today she is considering the next career in her eyes, she wants to be a mother, and this is what reunited us 21 years later. She had developed an urge so powerful to meet the surgeon who had given her the opportunity for this second birthday and new life that she did not quit searching until she succeeded. I met this new Julia in Ukraine just last week.Dr No and Julia

Parents of children with single ventricle should celebrate the lives these children have and always remember that these ‘Ugly Ducklings’ can and do grow up to be magnificent Swans.Julia smiling

Dr. Novick’s Blog

Dr. Novick’s Blog

Blue Babies, Bombs and Bad Places

So what was it like to be the first American based pediatric cardiac team in Tehran, Iran since 1979?

Tehran at sunrise

Wonderful people, incredible hospitality, eager to learn new techniques and protocols for the care of their children with heart disease and guess what? Not one anti-American word spoken to us the entire trip, amazed? Shouldn’t be because people all over the world are the same, it is our governments that create the friction.

Fortunately we don’t deal with politics, we are Ambassadors of Good Will and we stick to that like glue.Surgery in Iran

One side note for all of you, we cannot seem to get away from Iraqi children. The mother in the photo is holding her 26 day old newborn who we performed an arterial switch operation on and as you can see the baby is fine. The mother is from Baghdad and she went to Nasiriyah to find our team and was told we were not there, but in Iran, so she came to Tehran to find us and have us operate on her child.Baby Misq and MotherImagine that, an Iraqi mother traveled to Iran to have an American team operate on her baby, this is the kind of diplomacy we love. We will be returning to Tehran in November, to do more work and to spread the diplomacy of Good Will!

Dr No

 

Children's Medical Centre Tehran